A Guide to Navigating Around Bible Code DNA
The Locations of Nested Codes: A Notation System


In the article, Did the Old Testament Have Just One Author?, we present 13 lengthy nested codes. Some of them are extremely long. It is hard to get one's mind around this real-life example of intense complexity. To better understand what nested ELSs are, it might be best to start with a very simple example. This example will also orient the reader to the numbering system and skip labeling system used in the above referenced article.

In this example, we will use part of the opening sentence of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. Its letters are laid out across the rows of the first six columns of letters on the left in Figure 1 below.


Figure 1

ELSs with a Skip of Six from the First Sentence of the Gettysburg Address






In the first column labeled 1+ are shown the letter numbers, beginning with the first letter of the sixth column in the above matrix of letters. The plus denotes that any ELS found in this column will have a positive skip. In the next to last column, we see that there are two 1+ skip ELSs, gab and to.

The minus sign in the 1 column indicates that any ELS found in this column will have a negative skip. In the last column, we see three consecutive 1 skip ELSs, we, cot and bag. So, we found five ELSs just within this one column of 12 letters. As is usually the case, such ELSs are very short, and consecutive ELSs do not form sentences, or even phrases, that make sense.

Figure 2 presents ELSs found within the first sentence of the Gettysburg Address that have a skip (12) that is twice that of those in Figure 1, and that are contained in the sixth column of the letter matrix extracted from Lincoln's famous words. There are four possible sets of letter strings within which ELSs may be found. The first one is denoted, 2+A and the second, 2+B. These two sets of letter sequences both have a positive skip. Set A begins with letter number one and includes every other number above that (the "odd" numbers). Set B begins with letter number two and includes every other number above that (the "even" numbers). The set, 2A, contains the same letters as those in 2+A, but in the opposite direction. Similarly, the set, 2B, contains the same letters as those in 2+B, but in the opposite direction.


Figure 2

ELSs with a Skip of 12 from the First Sentence of the Gettysburg Address






As we can see, there are three ELSs in this double skip collection of letter strings. Boe is a city in Guinea, Africa.

Figure 3 presents a comparable display for ELSs with triple the original skip of six, and that are contained in the sixth column of the letter matrix extracted from Lincoln's famous words. There are six possible sets of letter strings within which ELSs may be found. The first one is denoted, 3+A; the second, 3+B; and the third, 3+C. These three sets of letter sequences each have a positive skip. Set A begins with letter number one and includes every third number above that. Set B begins with letter number two and includes every third number above that. Set C begins with letter number three and includes every third number above that. The set, 3A, contains the same letters as those in 3+A, but in the opposite direction. Similarly, the set, 3B, contains the same letters as those in 3+B, but in the opposite direction, and so forth.


Figure 3

ELSs with a Skip of 18 from the First Sentence of the Gettysburg Address






There are again three short ELSs in these letter strings, as highlighted in yellow.

Curiously, the letters of many of these ELSs wrap around and connect with one another in a manner similar to molecules in DNA.

In the article, Did the Old Testament Have Just One Author?, we will also encounter ELSs with quadruple and quintuple the original skip, as well as one with half the original skip. The same labeling system described in this article is also used for these ELSs.


Related Article:

Did the Old Testament Have Just One Author?



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